Impatient Cow Productions

Motion Graphics - The Importance of Over Delivering On Your Client's Expectations


6 months ago

You’ve heard it before—regardless of industry or area of expertise, there’s this business idea out there that the most sure-fire way to keep clients coming back for more is to underpromise and overdeliver. While I can’t speak to the first half of the adage, the latter is something upon which I’ve built the entirety of my reputation both here at Impatient Cow, and before I came onboard as the Director of Motion Graphic Design.

Speaking of product, e-commerce-driven businesses, said Shopify’s Richard Lazazzera, “Top- performing companies create a renewable resource of loyal customers. By the end of year three in business, a majority of their revenue is coming from repeat purchases.” No, here at Impatient Cow, the products we regularly produce can’t be packaged in a box and sent to your doorstep. That said, the principle still remains the same—over-deliverance is a basic business must-have.

Establish Realistic Expectations

I’ve found that the best way to make this happen is to set sound expectations right from the get-go. I never undersell my abilities, but I want there to be a healthy level of understanding between the client and myself as to what they can expect, and how I’ll be able to deliver. With a budget in mind, my clients get the finest services their money can buy—no corner-cutting, here.

No Excuses—Never Miss a Deadline

Next, and this is where I’ll get off on a bit of a soapbox if I’m not careful, deadlines must be met. Over-delivering is one thing, but if you’re unable to deliver on a core promise the first time around, there’s no chance on earth a client will come back to you for help the next time they need it. As such, I build in time when submitting a proposal to tackle the extra things a project needs to truly set itself apart from the competition—anything else simply won’t suffice.

Seek a Second Opinion—or Third, or Fourth, or …

Last thing—to ensure that I both meet and exceed a client’s motion design needs, I always involve other team members. Fortunately, there’s plenty of talent in the Impatient Cow “herd” to provide worthwhile feedback. They see my work before a client does. If adjustments need to be made to go above and beyond the call of duty, it’s my job to make them.

Here’s a sample of some of the work done by everyone here at Impatient Cow:

As corny as it might sound, and as much razzing as I’m going to get from my coworkers, believe it or not, I still very much get a thrill out of seeing a client happy with the motion graphic work I’ve done. I’m confident that as long as I continue to over-deliver, this kind of positive response won’t be going anywhere anytime soon. It’s now your turn—in the comments section below or reaching out through Impatient Cow's Contact page, let me know what you think. Thanks!